7 Things You Probably Wrongly Believe About Burglaries

Posted Thursday, 08 January 2015 17:21 by Webmaster

Chances are pretty good that you, like most Americans believe some misconceptions about burglaries. Television programs, movies, and even video games do much to shape what we think is true. Unfortunately though, this leads us to draw some wrong conclusions—and those assumptions can put us in danger.

 

You probably do not need to worry about a burglary.

Wrong. Everyone should be concerned and aware of the possibility. In fact, the United States leads the world in the number of burglaries —with four occurring every minute. According to the FBI 2012 Crime report, we can expect one in every thirty-six homes in the United States to be burglarized this year.

Thieves get in from the back of the structure.

Wrong. National crime statistics show that 33 percent of intruders enter the home through the front door, and may target a home specifically because of the type of front door, such as a hollow core. Even more concerning many gain entrance through an unlocked door!

Burglaries happen while you are at home asleep.

Wrong. While that may be common in the movies, in real life thieves try to avoid burglarizing a home while people are home. 65% of burglaries happen between 6 am and 6pm, while most people are at work.

A Neighborhood Watch program alone is enough to deter or catch crime.

A neighborhood watch or even an eagle-eyed neighbor is great to have but not enough to rely on. The average burglary lasts only 8 minutes. If an intruder is spotted, chances are good that it will not be timely enough to get the criminals caught in the act.

A locked window is enough to deter crime.

In window entry crimes, 61% of them involve breaking the pane.

Home alarms are most helpful in alerting, not deterring crime.

Wrong. A recent study performed by the University of North Carolina at Charlotte’s Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology found that most criminals try to determine if a home has a home security alarm system before attempting to gain access. In fact, a vast majority of convicted burglars say that they intentionally avoided homes with security systems. Equally important, if an alarm sounded, they admitted to leaving, quickly and immediately.

Home Alarm Systems are not affordable.

The truth is, you probably spend more on coffee in a month than it costs to protect your home. Further, according to the most recent crime statistics provided by the FBI, the average loss of a burglary is around $2,000, which exceeds the price of a basic security system. And that does not factor in the additional cost of raised home insurance premiums or the emotional damage caused by crime.

If you have any questions about home alarm security systems, call First Response today (800)207-5301.